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Jan 30, 2013
Jan 17, 2012 / 32 notes
It finally happened. The NYT pay wall is staring me square in the face. I’ve managed to read hundreds (I estimate) of articles for free since the New York Times implemented their 20 free limit by visiting their Twitter feeds, letting my facebook friends dictate what I read and using search engines. Now, it’s all over. I’m frozen. I have no idea what to do.  
Apr 22, 2011 / 4 notes

It finally happened. The NYT pay wall is staring me square in the face. I’ve managed to read hundreds (I estimate) of articles for free since the New York Times implemented their 20 free limit by visiting their Twitter feeds, letting my facebook friends dictate what I read and using search engines. Now, it’s all over. I’m frozen. I have no idea what to do.  

theatlantic:

Tunisia, Egypt, Miami: The Importance of Internet Choke Points:

The news yesterday evening that Egypt had severed itself from the global Internet came at the same time as an ostensibly far less inflammatory announcement closer to home. Verizon, the telecom giant, would acquire “cloud computing company” Terremark for $1.4 billion. The purchase would “accelerate Verizon’s ‘everything-as-a-service’ cloud strategy,” the press release said. 
The trouble is that Terremark isn’t merely a cloud computing company. Or, more to the point, the cloud isn’t really a cloud.
Among its portfolio of data centers in the US, Europe and Latin America, Terremark owns one of the single most important buildings on the global Internet, a giant fortress on the edge of Miami’s downtown known as the NAP of the Americas. 
The Internet is a network of networks. But what’s often forgotten is that those networks actually have to physically connect — one router to another — often through something as simple and tangible as a yellow-jacketed fiber-optic cable. It’s safe to suspect a network engineer in Egypt had a few of them dangling in his hands last night.

Read the full article here.
Jan 28, 2011 / 29 notes

theatlantic:

Tunisia, Egypt, Miami: The Importance of Internet Choke Points:

The news yesterday evening that Egypt had severed itself from the global Internet came at the same time as an ostensibly far less inflammatory announcement closer to home. Verizon, the telecom giant, would acquire “cloud computing company” Terremark for $1.4 billion. The purchase would “accelerate Verizon’s ‘everything-as-a-service’ cloud strategy,” the press release said

The trouble is that Terremark isn’t merely a cloud computing company. Or, more to the point, the cloud isn’t really a cloud.

Among its portfolio of data centers in the US, Europe and Latin America, Terremark owns one of the single most important buildings on the global Internet, a giant fortress on the edge of Miami’s downtown known as the NAP of the Americas

The Internet is a network of networks. But what’s often forgotten is that those networks actually have to physically connect — one router to another — often through something as simple and tangible as a yellow-jacketed fiber-optic cable. It’s safe to suspect a network engineer in Egypt had a few of them dangling in his hands last night.

Read the full article here.