Photography

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Jan 29, 2013 / 57 notes

futurejournalismproject:

Behind the Polaroid

A (relatively) new book by Christopher Bonanos explores the life and inventions of Polaroid founder Edwin Land.

On the companion site to the book, Bonanos, an editor at New York Magazine, writes:

Instant: The Story of Polaroid is a book about a very unusual company. In the 1960s and 1970s, Polaroid was what Apple is today: the coolest technology company on earth, the one with irresistible products, the one whose stock kept climbing way past the point of logic. In its heyday, Polaroid was an absolute innovation machine—a scientific think tank that periodically kicked out a fantastically profitable, covetable product. In fact, the late Steve Jobs expressly said that he modeled his company to a great extent after Polaroid.

Visit the site for Bonanos’ blog about all things Polaroid past and present. The book is available here

Instant film should be treasured by everyone!

(via fastcompany)

Strasbourg, France: 2012. 
Nov 23, 2012 / 1 note

Strasbourg, France: 2012. 

It is estimated that 380 billion images were taken last year, most with a camera phone. A total of 300 million photos are uploaded on Facebook every month. Instagram is growing exponentially and had four billion photos uploaded as of July 2012.

Almost everyone has a camera and is a photographer.

Just as access to pens and paper hasn’t produced thousands of Shakespeares or Nabokovs, this explosion of camera phones doesn’t seem to have led to more Dorothea Langes or Henri Cartier-Bressons. But it has certainly led to many more images of what people ate at lunch…

…The question is not so much whether this is a good thing for society (or a bad thing for photographers). It is happening, a billion times a day, and there is no going back.

The question is: How does the photographic community harness this explosion of visual energy to expand its audience? This is what needs to be focused on.

James Estrin, New York Times Lens Blog. In an Age of Likes, Commonplace Images Prevail. (via futurejournalismproject)

I think the abundance of cameras in the world has democratized photography. I remember seeing photographs from Mexico in 1890 in an exhibit at SFMOMA, taken by what I imagine were rich expats, and thinking that these names were in museums because they they simply had access to a new technology. 20 years later and Manuel Alvarez Bravo was taking similar, and significantly better, photographs of his compatriots. 

I’m still a sucker for the dreamy desert landscape any day of the week. 

Sep 11, 2012 / 51 notes
timelightbox:

For the 20th anniversary of the L.A. riots, photographer Mae Ryan has made collages of then-and-now images. 
See more of her work here.
Apr 29, 2012 / 87 notes

timelightbox:

For the 20th anniversary of the L.A. riots, photographer Mae Ryan has made collages of then-and-now images.

See more of her work here.

Anna’s dad gave her an old Singer sewing machine and it’s beautiful. Blog post and more pics to come on citoyenmag.com.
Feb 14, 2012 / 6 notes

Anna’s dad gave her an old Singer sewing machine and it’s beautiful. Blog post and more pics to come on citoyenmag.com.

Oso & Mario: SF, CA: 2012
Fuji Instax Wide
Jan 30, 2012 / 1 note

Oso & Mario: SF, CA: 2012

Fuji Instax Wide

She took a chance on me in 2011.
Happy New Year, friends. 
Jan 1, 2012 / 10 notes

She took a chance on me in 2011.

Happy New Year, friends. 

I heard the boy’s dad say, “It feels like we’re in Paris or something.” He was right. I dropped a buck in the accordion player’s bag, stepped back, and looked around.
The boy was transfixed for about 90 seconds. I couldn’t tell if we was more interested in the music, the motions of the accordion, or the ragged and young guy standing partly in the rain. I think we both wondered if he was as happy as he looked playing that accordion.
I know it sure made the touristy market feel a few musical notes warmer. 
Dec 28, 2011 / 20 notes

I heard the boy’s dad say, “It feels like we’re in Paris or something.” He was right. I dropped a buck in the accordion player’s bag, stepped back, and looked around.

The boy was transfixed for about 90 seconds. I couldn’t tell if we was more interested in the music, the motions of the accordion, or the ragged and young guy standing partly in the rain. I think we both wondered if he was as happy as he looked playing that accordion.

I know it sure made the touristy market feel a few musical notes warmer. 

Everyone was watching fish flying through the market, but not this guy. He was overlooking the waters of Seattle while a steady drizzle splat on the tiles beneath him. I hurried over to the entrance of this balcony and took a couple of frames. The man was transfixed by the slow moving cruise ship. He soon left and I found myself taking his place. 
Seattle, WA: 2011. 
Dec 28, 2011 / 7 notes

Everyone was watching fish flying through the market, but not this guy. He was overlooking the waters of Seattle while a steady drizzle splat on the tiles beneath him. I hurried over to the entrance of this balcony and took a couple of frames. The man was transfixed by the slow moving cruise ship. He soon left and I found myself taking his place. 

Seattle, WA: 2011. 

My wife Anna keeps telling me to follow my dreams in pursuing a career in photography. She just upped the ante with this Christmas gift.

I can’t emphasize how fortunate I’ve been in my life to have people that support my shit. From my lower-middle-class parents saying yes to my education, studies abroad, and constant moving across the country (this was killer for my Mexican mama), to my wife constantly saying, “you can do anything.” And to my amigos/as who contribute to my inspiration year in and year out. Thanks. I hope to capture some beautiful images soon. Tulum, Burma (possibly!), and NYC are all planned this year.

Right now, it is a nice little walk throughout Bellingham, WA with my bad ass new tool. Baby, it is rockin’ outside.

Feliz Navidad.
Dec 25, 2011 / 9 notes

My wife Anna keeps telling me to follow my dreams in pursuing a career in photography. She just upped the ante with this Christmas gift.

I can’t emphasize how fortunate I’ve been in my life to have people that support my shit. From my lower-middle-class parents saying yes to my education, studies abroad, and constant moving across the country (this was killer for my Mexican mama), to my wife constantly saying, “you can do anything.” And to my amigos/as who contribute to my inspiration year in and year out. Thanks. I hope to capture some beautiful images soon. Tulum, Burma (possibly!), and NYC are all planned this year.

Right now, it is a nice little walk throughout Bellingham, WA with my bad ass new tool. Baby, it is rockin’ outside.

Feliz Navidad.

Dad: Los Angeles, CA: 2011.
Nov 25, 2011 / 8 notes

Dad: Los Angeles, CA: 2011.

Nov 22, 2011 / 10,950 notes

inothernews:

joshsternberg:

paid2see:

A protester handed President Barack Obama a note while shaking hands along a rope line in New Hampshire today.  Photographer Charlie Dharapak smartly zoomed in so you can read the note for yourself. 

“Banks got bailed out. We got sold out.”

Dhaparak likely had to move, slightly to the left, to get that shot.  Which means the President must have held it up long enough to read it.

President Obama, please don’t ignore this anymore.  Police brutality is police brutality.  Speak out against it.

Please.

What would Occupiers want, hypothetically, for the President to do immediately to help? 

From Seattle PI:
Seattle activist Dorli Rainey, 84, reacts after being hit with pepper spray during an Occupy Seattle protest on Tuesday, November 15, 2011 at Westlake Park. Protesters gathered in the intersection of 5th Avenue and Pine Street after marching from their camp at Seattle Central Community College in support of Occupy Wall Street. Many refused to move from the intersection after being ordered by police. Police then began spraying pepper spray into the gathered crowd hitting dozens of people. A pregnant woman was taken from the melee in an ambulance after being struck with spray. Photo: JOSHUA TRUJILLO / SEATTLEPI.COM
Nov 15, 2011 / 11 notes

From Seattle PI:

Seattle activist Dorli Rainey, 84, reacts after being hit with pepper spray during an Occupy Seattle protest on Tuesday, November 15, 2011 at Westlake Park. Protesters gathered in the intersection of 5th Avenue and Pine Street after marching from their camp at Seattle Central Community College in support of Occupy Wall Street. Many refused to move from the intersection after being ordered by police. Police then began spraying pepper spray into the gathered crowd hitting dozens of people. A pregnant woman was taken from the melee in an ambulance after being struck with spray. Photo: JOSHUA TRUJILLO / SEATTLEPI.COM
flavorpill:

Vintage Shots of Jean-Michel Basquiat’s SAMO© Graffiti

Get that Bowery blood boiling. 
Nov 1, 2011 / 42 notes
Oct 26, 2011

Washington Post Photo Editor Weighs In On Kitten Petting Police Officer

"When I was looking at the Tuesday wire service photographs from the Oakland City Hall grounds, the violent protest images were not in the mix because that confrontation had not yet occurred.  The late-night, violent protest was in response to the Tuesday eviction by the Oakland police.

Even though the story, written later in the evening, included information about the arrests and tear gas, no news images had moved by our production deadline, probably because Oakland is on Pacific time—a three-hour difference.  

The photograph was chosen because it was a visual “moment” in time showing a police officer doing something interesting—not just walking through tents and trash.  The wire service images that moved overnight and this morning offer a much different look at last night’s protest.”