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Portraits from Occupy Wall Street
David Hamilton, student, Queens, New York. “I hope, at the end of it,  that there is a better sense of fairness across the board.”
Last week, Martin Schoeller photographed Occupy Wall Street protesters at Zuccotti Park.
Oct 18, 2011 / 542 notes

newyorker:

Portraits from Occupy Wall Street

David Hamilton, student, Queens, New York. “I hope, at the end of it, that there is a better sense of fairness across the board.”

Last week, Martin Schoeller photographed Occupy Wall Street protesters at Zuccotti Park.
From the New Yorker: 

When a peacock escaped from the Central Park Zoo on Tuesday, the photographer Landon Nordeman, a frequent contributor, happened to be in the neighborhood. Choosing not to defy any peacock stereotypes, the bird had settled into a posh building on the Upper East Side, 838 Fifth Avenue, in a fifth-floor ledge with a Park view. He may have been free from captivity, but was no less the object of gawking. While passers-by spent the day photographing the bird on the lam, Landon spent the day—from 11 A.M. until 10:30 P.M.—photographing them. (The bird outlasted them all, staying until 6:45 the next morning.)
Aug 5, 2011 / 3 notes

From the New Yorker: 

When a peacock escaped from the Central Park Zoo on Tuesday, the photographer Landon Nordeman, a frequent contributor, happened to be in the neighborhood. Choosing not to defy any peacock stereotypes, the bird had settled into a posh building on the Upper East Side, 838 Fifth Avenue, in a fifth-floor ledge with a Park view. He may have been free from captivity, but was no less the object of gawking. While passers-by spent the day photographing the bird on the lam, Landon spent the day—from 11 A.M. until 10:30 P.M.—photographing them. (The bird outlasted them all, staying until 6:45 the next morning.)

newyorker:

Pictures from a RevolutionIn April, Human Rights Watch brought Platon to Cairo to photograph revolutionaries in Tahrir Square and other Egyptians. See the slideshow. Above: Ramy Essam became famous as “the Singer of the Revolution.” He was tortured by soldiers after Mubarak fell.
Jul 25, 2011 / 152 notes

newyorker:

Pictures from a Revolution

In April, Human Rights Watch brought Platon to Cairo to photograph revolutionaries in Tahrir Square and other Egyptians. See the slideshow.

Above: Ramy Essam became famous as “the Singer of the Revolution.” He was tortured by soldiers after Mubarak fell.